Livestock

  • Advantages of RFID/EID livestock tracking (versus manual tracking or barcode tracking).Provides a basis to quickly and accurately collect data on individual animals.
  • Eliminates the need for “line of sight” reading necessary with visual systems.
  • The RFID signal can penetrate body, tissue, wood, plastic, mud, manure, etc.
  • Most RFID livestock applications use passive RFID tags: the tags require no battery, tags last for the life of the animal.
  • RFID tags can create a single lifetime record of an animal and may contain information about the breed/lineage, farm on which the animal was produced, health records and other metrics.
  • RFID records may be shared with the livestock producer, stocker, feeder and the packer.
  • A growing number of countries export animals to other countries.  This global trade in livestock has led to the establishment of record keeping standards that use RFID technology as the main animal identification method.
  • Animal idenification systems typically operate in the (LF) range 134.2.  Low frequency RF energy is not as susceptibe to absorption by water and water-bearing animal tissue.  Many animal identification systems use ISO-based standards.  Livestock producers have a choice to capture as much or as little information as is needed: birth weight or date, or sire or dam information, etc,  EID allows for improved data capture and data management for key performance indicators. In its simplest application, an EID tag verifies animal identity electronically. When used as part of a performance or quality database, the resulting data can be a powerful tool to provide management information for improvement of genetics, enhanced feeding programs, and evaluation of other variables in animal production.
  • Inventory management is the driving force behind animal tracking with RFID technology. Being aware of the number and location of their stock at all times allows ranchers and other livestock producers to optimize the livestock's value.
  • RFID technology helps livestock producers round up stock more efficiently, provide feed and water at optimal locations when necessary, and may even handle some basic health monitoring such as the frequency with which animals visit feeding stations. A decrease in frequency of visits to feeding stations may be an indication of illness.
  • RFID technology is frequently deployed at automated feeding stations and in slaughterhouses so that the animal's carcass can be accounted for. Import/export considerations can also be monitored to assure customs authorities of the aninal's health history.
  • RFID technology has been used for wildlife conservation and tool that helps agencies track migration patterns, monitor population growth or decline, and evaluate breeding locations.